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Tuesday, September 23, 2014

BEAUTY TIPS FOR LIPS CARE


The way your lips look can affect the overall look of your face. Darkened, dry, chapped or bleeding lips can mar the beauty of your smile. A perfect pair of lips looks healthy, pink, soft and flexible. Find out how you can solve you lip problems at home.
To get lighten dark lips and make them pink, mix equal quantities of heavy cream, tomato paste and a good quality of pink lip colour. You should make a fresh mixture everyday and apply it on your lips. Within a few days, the colour change will become noticeable.
Stretchy, bleeding lips are an effect of dry and dead skin accumulating over the skin. Just mix some olive oil and sugar and rub it on your lips. You can also use a toothbrush to remove the dead skin, but be gentle. Once the dead skin is completely removed, your lips will be smooth and supple.
You can even make your very own lip balm at home by melting some bee wax with apricot oil and cooling it. Later, add some drops of coconut oil and mix. Keep aside till the mixture sets. You can use this balm everyday for strong, supple lips.

COFFEE NOT ONLY FOR HEALTH BUT ALSO FOR TEEN'S BEAUTY - USE COFFEE POWDER AS FACE PACK FOR LOOKING SHINY


Use these coffee face packs to draw your coffee-addict partner towards you. They are easy to make and well, everybody has coffee at home!

Honey coffee pack: We love coffee, we love honey! When you mix the two, think of the kind of delicious paste you will get. Mix a spoonful of each and slather it over your face. Wash it off after it dries to get beautifully soft, exfoliated skin.

Cocoa-coffee pack: It simply cannot get better than this! Think of what this mouthwatering, mind-blowing combo does to your senses... now think what it can do to your face! Both cocoa and coffee are antioxidants and when made into a paste using a little honey (another antioxidant) you will nourish your skin and cleanse it off all the grub you have accumulated all day.

Dry-skin pack: By mixing a little olive oil with some coffee powder, you will get a useful remedy for dry skin. Just make a paste it apply it on your face. Wash it off when the pack is still wet, don't let it dry off.

TIPS TO APPLY FACE CREAM - TEENS BEAUTY TIPS IN ENGLISH


If you are not sure how to apply a face cream the right way, here's how to find out

You might find it weird when we say that there's a right way to apply a face cream, but there actually is one. Here is what you need to do —

Wash your face first
No matter what time of the day you apply the face cream, you need to wash your face. This way you get rid of sweat, grime, makeup etc. This will allow the cream to penetrate into your pores and work its magic. Also use a gentle face cleanser to wash it off properly.

Application on damp skin
Always apply your face cream on damp skin. If you wait for your face to dry off completely, it won't work. Creams are better able to lock in moisture when you apply on damp skin. After you finish, pat your skin dry.

Use small quantities
The best way to apply a face cream is using small quantities. Using more doesn't always show the benefits. It takes a long time to rub the cream on your face as opposed to when you use less. Your face should be able to absorb the cream rather than feel sticky.

Dab it smooth
Instead of taking a finger full of it, apply small spots all over your face and then smoothen it out. This way you will be able to apply the cream on every bit of your face.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Article about Lajja Gauri is Bolon's Forms of the Goddess Lajja Gauri in Indian Art,


This sculpture is also from the Sangameshwara Temple
complex, Kudavelli, Kurnool District, Andhra Pradesh,
India, c. 650 CE. 


This is a stone sculpture of Lajja Gauri from the Sangameshwara
Temple, Kudavelli, Kurnool District,Andhra Pradesh,
India, c. 650 CE, now in the Alampur Museum.


This is a stone sculpture from Naganatha Temple, Bijapur District, Karnataka, India, c. 650 CE, now in the Badami Museum.


This is a graphite and chalk drawing I made of Lajja Gauri, in 2002, based on a seventh-century sculpture. 


Shakti Sadhana


In the first age of the gods, existence was born from non-existence.
The quarters of the sky were born from Her who crouched with legs spread.
The earth was born from Her who crouched with legs spread,
And from the earth the quarters of the sky were born.
Rig Veda, 10.72.3-4



Aditi



INTRODUCTION


Devi in Her form as Aditi is also known as Lajja Gauri, Adya Shakti, Matangi, Renuka, and many other names. She is the most ancient Goddess form in the religious complex that is today referred to as Hinduism.
This mysterious, lotus-headed Goddess, who is always portrayed with legs opened and raised in a manner suggesting either birthing (her posture is the traditional Indian village posture for giving birth) or sexual receptivity, is most frequently referred to today as Lajja Gauri. But She is undoubtedly rooted in India's prehistory -- probably orginating in the Neolithic Indus Valley (Harappan or Saraswati) Civilization.
For example, the religious historian N. N. Bhattacharyya refers to "a seal unearthed at Harappa, show[ing] a nude female figure, head downwards and legs stretched upwards, with a plant issuing out of her womb," which may be a proto-Aditi/Lajja Gauri figure. Similar images, sculpted as recently as the 19th century, can still be found in Rajasthan (part of the region where the ancient Harappan Civilization flourished).
In discussing the seal (and the wealth of other apparent Goddess figurines associated with Harappan Civilization), Bhattacharyya posits that "in the pre-Vedic religion of India, a great Mother Goddess, the personification of all the reproductive energies of nature, was worshiped. ... The Harappan Magna Mater [Great Mother] was probably reflected in the [later Vedic] conception of Aditi, the mother of the gods, thought to be a goddess of yore even in the Rig Vedaitself." And indeed, the Vedic description of Aditi does suggest a rather comprehensive deity:
Aditi is the sky
Aditi is the air
Aditi is all gods ...
Aditi is the Mother, the Father, and Son
Aditi is whatever shall be born.
Rig Veda, I.89.10

"Aditi," Bhattacharyya concludes, "was the most ancient mother of the gods, whose original features [had become] obscure even in the Vedic age." And despite Her extreme antiquity, Lajja Gauri is still actively worshiped even today as a "fertility goddess" in some remote, rural locales. But we must not forget that the totality of Her original (and eternal) significance is much greater than this.
During the 6th to 12th centuries CE, in fact, the cult of Aditi/Lajja Gauri grew prodigiously; Her images proliferated in central India -- both in small terra cotta figures for use in home shrines, and in large (even life-size) stone sculptures for richly endowed temples. By the 13th century, however, She began a long slide into obscurity. Scholars partially attribute the decline to India's Muslim and later British Christian rulers and their intolerant attitude toward portrayals of human (and particularly female) nudity and sexuality. Another possible factor was the rise of the Tantric Goddess cults, which developed subtler, more abstract ways of depicting the primal, creative force of the Divine Feminine.



HER STORY

The first scriptural references to Aditi appear in no less exalted a source than the Rig Veda itself. Here, She is also referred to as Uttanapad (a term literally describing Her posture; see the passage quoted at the top of this page). The eminent Sanskrit scholar, Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty, identifies this Vedic Goddess as "the female principle of creation or infinity":

"[This] creation myth centers upon the image of the Goddess who crouches with legs spread (Uttanapad). This term, often taken as a proper name, designates a position associated both with yoga and with a woman giving birth, as the Mother Goddess is often depicted in early sculpture: literally, with feet stretched forward, more particularly with knees drawn up and legs spread wide."
O'Flaherty's colleague, Carol Radcliffe Bolon, agrees that the "form of the Goddess most widely known today as Lajja Gauri fits the Vedic descriptions of the Mother of the Gods, Aditi," but notes that the unlettered artisans who carved Her images and the devotees who worshipped Her were probably unaware of this formidable pedigree.
In this case, however, ignorance of priestly interpretations was probably not much of a handicap: Lajja's visual message seems abundantly clear. Her frequent juxtaposition with the Shiva linga (an aniconic, phallic form of the Divine Masculine Principle), and Her association with lions and the god Ganesh, suggest beyond a doubt that She was considered a manifestation of the Supreme Devi, specifically Parvati (who is also called Gauri). Her size (always equal to Shiva's), and the prominent display of Her full breasts (suggesting life-giving nurture and sustenance) and yoni (vulva, womb; suggesting generative, creative power) indicate that She probably served as a Feminine counterpart to the Masculine linga. 

Several myths exist concerning Lajja Gauri, but scholars consider them to be inauthentic, late attempts to replace the Goddess's original, forgotten lore. Many of these tales involve a dominant Lord Shiva testing his wife's modesty by publicly disrobing Her, whereupon Her head either falls off or sinks into Her body from shame, thereby proving Her purity -- and providing a Shiva-centered explanation of how such a boldly self-displaying Goddess got a name like "Lajja Gauri" -- literally, "Modest Parvati" or "Ashamed Parvati."

More useful clues to Her actual meaning may be found in the oral folktales that still circulate about Her in rural India. For example, as noted above, She is often referred to as Matangi, the "outcaste goddess" form of Parvati, who is known for ignoring and flaunting society's rules, hierarchies and conventions. Elsewhere, She is called Renuka, an outcaste woman beheaded by a high-caste man. Rather than dying, Renuka grew a lotus in place of her head and became a Goddess. These stories -- both involving the deification of an outcaste woman -- seem to suggest the irrepressibility of the Feminine Principle, its transcendence of and ultimate superiority over any manmade social systems that would attempt to contain or control the pure force of feminine creative power. And lest we underestimate the primal persistence and importance of this archetype to the human psyche, recall that the oldest known sculpture made by a human being -- the so-called Willendorf Goddess or "Venus," c. 30,000-40,000 BCE -- also depicts a nude female deity with a flower for a head.



HER ICONOGRAPHY

Whatever Lajja Gauri's ultimate origins, She is clearly a very auspicious Goddess. Everything about Her suggests life, creativity, and abundance. Her images are almost always associated with springs, waterfalls and other sources of running water -- vivid symbols of life-giving sustenance. Her belly usually protrudes, suggesting fullness and/or pregnancy; in earlier sculptures, Her torso was often portrayed as an actual pot, another ancient symbol of wealth and abundance. Lajja Gauri's head is usually a lotus flower, an extremely powerful, elemental symbol of both material and spiritual well-being. (Interestingly, today's images of the popular Goddess Lakshmi -- patroness of wealth and material fulfillment -- are also rife with water, pots and lotuses.) The often vine-like portrayal of Lajja Gauri's limbs suggests a further creative association -- the life-giving sap of the plant world; She is vegetative as well as human abundance. Her images are virtually always prone, laying at or below floor level in her characteristic uttanapad posture, as though rising from the Earth itself, a manifestation of the primordial Yoni from which all life springs. Indeed, Her birth/sexual posture unambiguously denotes fertility and reproductive power. This is Devi as the Creatress, as Mother of the Universe, as the Life-Giving Force of Nature, in a bold, uncompromising display of the Divine Feminine Principle. The late scholar David Kinsley, who wrote several popular studies of the Goddess in India, noted that Lajja Gauri's headlessness is meant to focus Her devotee's attention away from Her individual personalities, and upon Her cosmogonic function as the Source of Everything That Is. He wrote in 1986:

"Some very ancient ... examples have been discovered in India of nude goddesses squatting or with their thighs spread ... The arresting iconographic feature of these images is their sexual organs, which are openly displayed. These figures often have their arms raised above their bodies and are headless or faceless. Most likely, the headlessness of the figures [is intended to] focus attention on their physiology, [placing the] emphasis on sexual vigor, life, and nourishment."
Without a doubt, the most comprehensive monograph to date on Lajja Gauri is Bolon's Forms of the Goddess Lajja Gauri in Indian Art, published in 1992 by Penn State University Press. Bolon judges that the final image shown on this page (the large sculpted image at right) is probably the finest Lajja Gauri sculpture still in existence. Here is her lyrical description of the idol:
"The modeling of the female figure is supple and sensitive. The suggestion of soft, sagging stomach flesh, like the slackening of a woman's abdomen after childbirth, is masterly. The breasts are firm with folds of flesh beneath them. The arms and shoulders are delicate and feminine. The legs, in uttanapad, are spread more naturally than in other [Lajja Gauri] images with the knees up, the feet are flexed with soles up, and the toes are tensed. The nude body is ornamented with necklace, channavira [body-encompassing jewelry that hangs from the neck, crosses between the breasts, passes around the waist and up the back], girdle, bracelets, and armlets that are like a vine tendril wrapping around the arms and actually ending in a leaf. Tassels of the anklets also seem plantlike. There is a cloth woven through the thighs.
"... The half-open lotus flower, sitting like a ruff on the shoulders, is turned three-quarters toward the viewer. The goddess holds, to either side of her lotus head, a half-open, smaller lotus flower, the stalk of which winds around her hand. The fingers themselves have a tentril-like quality. The fingers of the right hand seem to form a svastika, symbol of fortune and well-being. No doubt, the suggestion of her relation to vegetation is intended. ... This image is a masterpiece of fluid modeling and conscious symbol-making."
Aum Maatangyai Namahe

Lajja Gauri is a goddess associated with abundance and fertility, and she has been euphemistically described as Lajja (that is, modesty).




FURTHER MORE DETAILS ABOUT GODDESS LAJJA GAURI 

FROM WIKIPEDIA LINK ABOVE


History[edit]

Main article: History of Shaktism
Early depictions of Lajja Gauri in Shaktism cults were found in the Indus Valley seals,[1] though her later depiction dates to the 1-3rd century, and her worship is prevalent in theDeccan, a region of the Indian subcontinent.

Iconography[edit]

Her fertility aspect is emphasized by symbolic representation of the genitals, Yoni or the Womb, as blooming Lotus flower denoting blooming youth in some cases and in others through a simple yet detailed depiction of an exposed vulva. Added to the fact that she is sitting in a squatting position (uttanpada) with legs open, as in during childbirth, in some cases, the right foot is placed on a platform to facilitate full opening. She is invoked for abundant crops (vegetative fertility) and good progeny. A blossoming lotus replaces her head and neck, an icon often used in Tantra. The seven Chakras of human energy anatomy are often depicted as blossoming lotuses, and the Goddess is often depicted in her Sri Yantraas a Yoni, shown as a simplified triangle at the centre. Further, most fertility goddesses of the Ancient world are similarly shown headless, while giving prominent focus to the genitals.[2] The arms of the goddess are bent upwards, each holding a lotus stem, held at the level of the head again depicted by the matured lotus flower.
Owing to an absence of verifiable text in Vedic traditions on the iconography, she doesn’t seem to hold any exalted position in Hindu pantheon, despite her strong presence throughout India, especially in the tribal region of Bastar in Central India and downwards to the South, suggesting that the goddess had a cult of her own, later embraced into the mainstream religion through the myths of Sati and Parvati. The goddess is sometimes called Lajja Gauri, interpreted by some as the Innocent Creatrix, the Creator deity [3] or at times simply "Headless Goddess", or Aditi Uttanapada [1] by modern archeologist, academicians and Indologists,.[1]
Terracotta figurines and statues of this goddess have been found throughout India, dating back to 1st century AD, especially from Southern India [4] The majority were carved in theGupta and post-Gupta periods.[1]

Various forms[edit]

Devi, the Great Mother Goddess of Hinduism, in Her form as Lajja Gauri, is also known as Aditi, Adya Shakti; Renuka wife of sage Jamadagni, who is worshipped for fertility asMatangi and Yallamma (everybody's mother),[5] Kotari, Kotavi (a nude folk goddess), KottaMahika, Kotmai, and many other names. She is the most ancient Goddess form in the religious complex that is today referred to as Hinduism, whose worship is prevalent in villages of GujaratMaharashtra where a notable sculpture dating 150 - 300 CE was found atAmravati (now kept at State Museum, Chennai),[6] Tribal areas of Central IndiaAndhra PradeshKarnataka, where the town of Badami, known for the Badami Cave Temples, has a sculpture of the deity preserved at the local Archeological Museum, originally found in Naganatha Temple, Naganathakolla, Bijapur District,[7] and has an extant temple dedicated to the goddess in Badami Chalukya Architecture, within the town precincts dating to Chalukya Empire which flourished around 6th century AD.[8]
Another interpretation as suggested by Dr. Ramachandra C. Dhere in his book entitled, Lajja Gauri is that Lanja/Lanjika means 'naked', reminds us of the geographical area in Konkan (Maharashtra), called Lanja.

Further reading[edit]

  • Forms of the Goddess Lajja Gauri in Indian Art, by Bolon, Carol Radcliffe. 1992. ISBN 978-0-271-00761-8.
  • The Universal Mother, by Shanti Lal Nagar. Published by Atma Ram & Sons, 1989. ISBN 81-7043-113-1. Chapter 18: The Mother Goddess as Aditi/Lajja Gauri. Page 200
  • Lajja Gauri Seals and related antiquities from Kashmir Smast, Gandhara, South Asian studies, British Academy, London, ROYAUME-UNI (Revue). ISSN 0266-6030. 2002, vol. 18, pp. 83–90.
  • "Sacred Display: Divine and Magical Female Figures of Eurasia." Miriam Robbins Dexter and Victor H. Mair. Amherst, New York: Cambria Press, 2010

See also[edit]


ARTICLE ABOUT STORY IN INDIAN ANCIENT HISTORY OF THE MYSTERIOUS ADITI or LAJJA GAURI GODDESS also known as Adya Shakti, Matangi, Renuka, and many other names.


THE MYSTERIOUS ADITI or LAJJA GAURI

By Devi Bhakta, © 2006

There is an iconographically striking form of the Devi whose images can be found distributed almost evenly throughout India. This mysterious, lotus-headed Goddess – who is almost always portrayed with Her legs open and raised in a manner suggesting either birthing, self-display, or sexual receptivity – is most frequently referred to today as Lajja Gauri, though She is also known as Adya Shakti, Matangi, Renuka, and many other names.

“The abundance of names may be due to regional replacements of a lost original name,” suggests Carol Radcliffe Bolon, assistant curator of South and Southeast Asian Art at the Sackler and Freer Galleries in Washington, D.C. I have asked a few experienced upasakas whether they knew of any mantric or yantric representations of Lajja Gauri – they did not. “You see,” one of them told me, “Lajja is Aditi, the primordial mother. She is unimaginably ancient.”

Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit- English Dictionary assigns to the name Aditi the concepts of “boundlessness, immensity, inexhaustible abundance, unimpaired condition, perfection, creative power”; as a proper noun, it defines Her as “one of the most ancient of the Indian goddesses ([her name implying] ‘Infinity’ or the ‘Eternal and Infinite Expanse’).” This same Aditi is referenced in the Rig Veda in terms that perfectly express Lajja Gauri’s iconography:

devAnAm yuge prathame.asataH sadajAyata |
tadAśA anvajAyanta taduttAnapadas pari ||
bhUrjajNa uttAnapado bhuva AśA ajAyanta |
aditerdakSHoajAyata dakSHAd vaditiH pari ||

In the first age of the gods, existence was born from nonexistence. The quarters of the sky were born from Her who crouched with legs spread. The Earth was born from Her who crouched with legs spread, And from the Earth the quarters of the sky were born. (Rg Veda, X.72.3-4)

The scholar Wendy Doniger O’Flaherty identifies Aditi as “the female principle of creation or infinity,” whose designation uttAnapad refers to “a position associated both with yoga and with a woman giving birth, as the Mother Goddess is often depicted in early sculpture: literally, with feet stretched forward, more particularly with knees drawn up and legs spread wide.”

Bhattacharyya, in his “History of the Sakta Religion”, refers to “a seal unearthed at Harappa [a Saraswati Culture site], showing a nude female figure, head downwards and legs stretched upwards, with a plant issuing out of Her womb,” which may be a proto-Aditi/Lajja Gauri figure. Similar images, some sculpted as recently as the 19th century, can still be found in Rajasthan, part of the region where the Saraswati Civilization once flourished.

In discussing the Harappan seal, Bhattacharyya posits that “in the pre-Vedic religion of India, a great Mother Goddess, the personification of all the reproductive energies of nature, was worshiped. ... The Harappan Magna Mater [Great Mother] was probably reflected in the [later, Vedic] conception of Aditi, the mother of the gods, thought to be a goddess of yore even in the Rig Veda itself.” And here is where we find the Vedic rishis’ understanding of this Goddess, who was apparently as old as human consciousness itself:

aditirdyaur aditirantarikSHam aditirmAtA sa pitA sa putraH |
viśve devA aditiH paNca janA aditirjAtam aditirjanitvam ||

Aditi is the sky
Aditi is the air
Aditi is all the gods...
Aditi is the Mother, the Father, and Son
Aditi is whatever shall be born.
(Rg Veda, I.89.10)

“Aditi,” Bhattacharyya concludes, “was the most ancient Mother of the Gods, whose original features [had become] obscure even in the Vedic age.” Despite Her extreme antiquity, Lajja Gauri is still actively worshiped even today as a “fertility goddess” in some remote, rural locales. But we mustn’t let that obscure the totality of Her original (and eternal) significance.

During the 6th to 12th centuries CE – a period in which “Tantric kingdoms” flourished across India (as detailed by David Gordon White in his 2003 study, “The Kiss of the Yogini”) – the cult of Aditi/Lajja Gauri grew prodigiously. Her images proliferated, especially in central India – both in small terra cotta figures for use in home shrines, and in large (even lifesize) stone sculptures for richly endowed temples.

By the 13th century, however, She had begun a long slide into obscurity. Scholars partially attribute the decline to India’s Muslim and later British Christian rulers and their intolerance toward portrayals of human (and particularly female) nudity and sexuality. Another possible factor was the continued evolution of the Tantric systems, which developed ever more subtle and abstract ways of depicting the primal, creative force of the Divine Feminine.

LAJJA GAURI AND HER SYMBOLISM

Several myths exist concerning Lajja Gauri, but most scholars consider them to be inauthentic, late attempts to replace the Goddess’s original, forgotten lore. Many of these tales involve a dominant Lord Shiva testing his wife’s modesty by publicly disrobing Her, whereupon Her head either falls off or sinks into Her body from shame, thereby proving Her purity – and providing a more Shiva-centric explanation of how such a boldly self-displaying Goddess got a name like Lajja Gauri; literally, “Modest Parvati” or “Ashamed Parvati” (or more interestingly, “Innocent Parvati”). More useful clues to Lajja’s actual meaning may be found in the oral folktales that still circulate about Her in rural India.

For example, as noted above, She is sometimes referred to as Matangi, the “outcaste” form of Parvati, who is known for ignoring and flaunting society’s rules, hierarchies and conventions. Elsewhere, She is called Renuka – another outcaste woman, beheaded by a high-caste man. Rather than dying, Renuka grew a lotus in place of Her head and became a Goddess. These stories – both involving the deification of an outcaste woman – seem, among many other implications of course, to suggest the irrepressibility of the Feminine Principle. And lest we underestimate the primal persistence and importance of this archetype to the human psyche, recall that the oldest known sculpture made by a human being – the so-called Willendorf Goddess or “Venus,” created some 30,000 to 40,000 years ago – also depicts a nude female with sexual organs emphasized, and a flower for a head.

Whatever Lajja Gauri’s ultimate origins, She is clearly a very auspicious Goddess. Everything about Her suggests life, creativity, and abundance. Her images are almost always associated with springs, waterfalls and other sources of running water – vivid symbols of life-giving sustenance. Her belly usually protrudes, suggesting fullness and/or pregnancy; in earlier renderings, Her torso was often portrayed as an actual pUrna kumbha (brimming pot), another ancient symbol of wealth and abundance. Lajja Gauri’s head is usually a lotus flower, an extremely powerful, elemental symbol of both material and spiritual well-being. (Interestingly, today’s images of Lakshmi – patroness of wealth and material fulfillment – are also rife with water, pots and lotuses.)

The often vine-like portrayal of Lajja Gauri’s limbs suggests a further creative association – the life-giving sap of the plant world; She is vegetative as well as human abundance. Her images are virtually always prone, laying at or below floor level in Her characteristic uttAnapad posture, as though rising from the Earth itself, a manifestation of the primordial Yoni from which all life springs. Indeed, Her birthing/sexual posture unambiguously denotes fertility and reproductive power. This is Devi as the Creator, as Mother of the Universe, as the Life-Giving Force of Nature. The late scholar David Kinsley, author of several respected studies of the Goddess in India, noted:

“Some very ancient examples have been discovered in India of nude goddesses squatting or with their thighs spread ... The arresting iconographic feature of these images is their sexual organs, which are openly displayed. These figures often have their arms raised above their bodies and are headless or faceless. Most likely, the headlessness of the figures [is intended to] focus attention on their physiology, [placing the] emphasis on sexual vigor, life, and nourishment [rather than an individual persona].”

Joshi has even drawn some tentative lines of association with the later Tantric Mahavidya (Wisdom Goddess) known as Chinnamasta, the self-decapitating Goddess. Bolon, for her part, judges that the artistically finest Lajja Gauri sculpture still in existence is a life-sized c. 650-700 CE murthi, originally worshiped at the Naganatha Temple in Naganathakolla, Bijapur District, Karnataka. That sculpture (upon which this painting was based) is now housed at the Badami Museum. Of Her image, Bolon writes:

“The modeling of the female figure is supple and sensitive. The suggestion of soft, sagging stomach flesh, like the slackening of a woman’s abdomen after childbirth, is masterly. The breasts are firm with folds of flesh beneath them. The arms and shoulders are delicate and feminine. The legs, in uttanapad, are spread more naturally than in other [Lajja Gauri] images; with the knees up, the feet are flexed with soles up, and the toes are tensed. The nude body is ornamented with necklace, channavira [body-encompassing jewelry that hangs from the neck, crosses between the breasts, passes around the waist and up the back], girdle, bracelets, and armlets that are like a vine tendril wrapping around the arms and actually ending in a leaf. Tassels of the anklets also seem plantlike. There is a cloth woven through the thighs.”

In place of a head, a “half-open lotus flower, sits like a ruff on [Her] shoulders, … turned three-quarters toward the viewer. The goddess holds, to either side of Her lotus head, a half-open, smaller lotus flower, the stalk of which winds around Her hand. The fingers themselves have a tentril-like quality. The fingers of the right hand seem to form a svastika, symbol of fortune and well-being. No doubt, the suggestion of Her relation to vegetation is intended. ... This image is a masterpiece of fluid modeling and conscious symbol-making.”

As with the first artistic expressions of human consciousness in the Upper Paleolithic era, the primordial antiquity of the image does nothing to diminish the subtle elegance and refinement of Her beauty – both in the conception and in the physical representation. For those of us on the path of Srividya, She is a reminder of both the ultimate simplicity and the overwhelming antiquity of the teachings that we follow.

Article about Lajja Gauri. Naganathakolla, Naganatha Temple, Bijapur District, Karnataka, Badami Museum B36, 38 x 28 inches, stone, late seventh century.


Lajja Gauri. Naganathakolla, Naganatha Temple, Bijapur District, Karnataka, Badami Museum B36, 38 x 28 inches, stone, late seventh century.

"The modeling of the female figure is supple and sensitive. The suggestion of soft, sagging stomach flesh, like the slackening of a woman's abdomen after childbirth, is masterly. The breasts are firm, with folds of flesh beneath them. The arms and shoulders are delicate and feminine. The legs, in uttaanapad, are spread more naturally than in other [Lajja Gauri] images, with the knees up. The feet are flexed with soles up, and the toes are tensed. The nude body is ornamented with necklace, channavira, girdle, bracelets, and armlets that are like a vine tendril wrapping around the arms and actually ending in a leaf. Tassels of the anklets also seem plantlike. There is a cloth woven through the thighs. ...

The half-open lotus flower, sitting like a ruff on the shoulders, is turned three-quarters toward the viewer. The goddess holds, to either side of her lotus head, a half-open, smaller lotus flower, the stalk of which winds around her hand. The fingers themselves have a tendril-like quality. The fingers of the right hand seem to form a swastika, symbol of fortune and well-being. No doubt, the suggestion of her relation to vegetation is intended. This image is a masterpiece of fluid modeling and conscious symbol-making. It is no wonder that three copies were apparently made, at Bala Brahma temple, Mahakutesvara, and Chikkamahakuta."

_ Bolon, Carol Radcliffe, "Forms of the Goddess Lajja Gauri in Indian Art." Pennsylvania State University, 1992, p. 27.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Some suffer too much, others too little - Gautham Buddha Life Quotations


Have compassion for all beings, rich and poor alike; 

each has their suffering. 

Some suffer too much, others too little 

~ Buddha

GAUTHAM BUDDHA QUOTATIONS IN ENGLISH


You can win a thousand times a thousand men in battle, 

but only that who conquers himself,

 is the greatest warrior. ~ Buddha 

MUGDHA ART STUDIO




I have watched her born.
I watched her stand and fall,
Walk and fall again. 
I was scared, can she be herself, will she be loved.

Today she is two years old.

She is my daughter, she is my son, she is my world.

She is "Mugdha".

We are growing tall and beautiful.A million fans across the world,
There is space for us in a thousand hearts. Last year on this very day, we had 1 lakh people who loved us,Today, the number has quadrupled.

I sometimes wonder, are we running fast?
But then, I tell myself, it is not a race, there are miles to go. It is just the beginning.

Our family has become big, our hearts have become bigger.
We have actually understood the essence of beauty.
"It was never about Clothes, it is always about People!"

We have grown and so has your love for us.
Every dress we make, every client we meet, it is still an exam for us.
Even today, I feel proud every single time someone tells me that they love my work,I am excited by every single like I get on facebook.
On our first fashion show, we had Tapsee Pannu as the Showstopper.

But we had our downs too.I still have bad hair days.
Even today people talk about the color of my skin.
Why is it that we Indians are so fascinated with the fair complexion?

"I represent Mugdha and my work speaks for itself."

Twenty four hours doesn’t seem enough for a day. And the time, it just keeps running.Every day is a learning.

I know I am not alone. We have and will always have you to back us up.To hold us when we are down, to help us when we are lost.
To forgive us for our mistakes, to be there as a friend forever.

We just cannot thank enough for all your support and love.
You have made this journey really awesome.

"We have spread our Wings, now is the time to FLY."

Let’s celebrate beauty together.

Mugdha by Sashi Vangapalli

remember, the one you lost.


Take the time to say "love" to ...We call it often, in our time, we repeat and faith in our people, we have sent down to zero, without thinking that that word we say take your time Taming "forgive."..not all is forgiven in the world, unfortunately.
Do not say "my, don't let go" ... ....Let me go, don't hold prividen′e.
Take the time to say "go away" ... ....the one who dreamed of you once, perhaps, next to you on the road, goes through the pain, hurt and loss.
Don't tell people to "never", especially that trust.
Perhaps, through the long year-you remember, the one you lost.

Shit...bloody English - English Jokes Collection



Husband message wife : Hi, what are you doing Darling ??
Wife : Iam Dying...
Husband jumps with joy but types: oh Dear,how can I live without you??
wife: you Idiot,I am dying my hair
Husband: shit...bloody English

THE WORSHIP OF ANJANEYA SWAMI - DEVOTIONAL WORSHIPPING OF LORD HANUMAN SONGS AND PRAYERS


JAYA HANUMAN A GNAANA GUNA SAGARA 
Aamushi krutha marthaandam
goshpathi krutha sagaram ||
thrunee krutha dasagreevam
Anjaneyam namamyaham ||

He, who tried to devour the rays of the Sun in one stroke, who crossed the sea as if it is the distance between the front and back legs of the cow , who considered Ravana (Dasagriva) as trifle like grass and ignored him, - I pay obeisance to that Anjaneya.
asaadhya sadhaka swamin
asaadhyam thavakim vadha ||
ramadootha krupasindho
mathkaryam sadhaya prabho ||

He, who could achieve that which is impossible, who could do even the most difficult things- Swamin! Hey Swami- Please tell me: Is there anything that you cannot do? You are the ambassador of Lord Rama, you are the ocean of ompassion; Prabho (Prabhu in Sanskrit has the meaning - One who can do, undo and do in another way) please help me in discharging my duties and responsibilities.
sarva kalyana thaatharam sarvaapadhgana vaarakam ||
apara karuna murthim anjaneyam namamyaham ||

Hey Anjaneya ! who is the giver of all good things, who protect from all adversaries, who is the
repository of immeasurable love and compassion, I pay my obeisance to you.

doorikirutha sitarthi prikateekirutha
rama vaibhava spurithi: ||
dharita dasamukha kirthi: puratho 
mama pathu hanumato murti: ||

May Lord Hanuman, who got rid of the sufferings of Sita, who brought out succinctly the character and special qualities of Lord Rama, who brought down the fame of Ravana, standing before me, protect me.
Khyatah: SriRamaduth: Pavanatanubhavah:
Pingalaksah: Sikhavan 
Sita Sokapahari dasamukhavijayi
Lakshmanapranadata | 
Aneta Bhesajadreh: Lavanajalanidheh
Langane Diksito yah: 
Virasriman Hanuman mama
manasi Vasan Karyasidhmadhim tanotu ||

Let veera Sriman Hanuman lives in my mind and guide me in every aspect and lead me to victory. This Hanuman, known as the Ramadootha - the messenger of Sri Rama - was born to the Wind God Pavana, the Vayu, his eyes are light yellow in colour, has long hair. He is the one who helped Sita to get rid of her sorrow by conquering the Dasamuka rakshasa, Ravana; gave life to Lakshmana when he was lying unconscious bringing the herbal mountain itself for this purpose (as he had no time to search and select the proper medicinal herbs) and this is the same Hanuman who showed that he has the capability of crossing the Ocean.
Sarvarista nivarakamam subhakaram
Pingaksamaghapaham
Sitanveshana tatparam kapivaram
Kotindu Surya prabham |
Lankadvipa Bhayankaram sakaladam
Sugriva sammanitam
Devendradi samasta Deva vinutam
Kakustha dutam Bhaje ||

My salutations to this Hanuman who always brings subham - everything that is good - for his devotees and eliminates the bad and the evil. He removes even the traces of bad thoughts and deeds from his devotees. i.e he makes them pure in words, thought and deed. With eyes yellow in colour, he is said to be the best among the kapi- the monkeys. He is the one as bright as koti Suryas and koti Chandras (million Suns and Moons) who went in search of Sita. He was a threat to the island of Lanka, but for his devotees he is the one who bestows everything. He was praised by Sugriva. Being the messenger of Rama (the descendent of Kakusth dynasty) he is revered by all Devas including Indra.
THE WORSHIP OF ANJANEYA SWAMI...
Sri Kanchi Kamakoti Jagat guru 
Sri Jayendra Saraswathi 
Sankaracharya swamigal

In many temples, Anjaneya has been installed. Ofcourse, in the Rama temple, Anjaneya in bound to be there. But even in other temples, Anjaneya is often installed. For instance in the Vinayaka temple at Sarojini Nagar, New Delhi, whose Kumbhabhishekam was performed on the 13th June 1973, there is an Anjaneyasannidhi.
What are the fruits that we get by worshipping Anjaneya? These are beautifully summed up in the following sloka:
बुद्धिर्बलमं यशॊ धैर्यं निर्भयत्वमरॊगता । 
आजाड्यं वाक्पटुत्वं च हनुमत्स्मरणाद्भवेत् ॥
The order in which these fruits are mentioned is very significant. First buddhi is mentioned. By worshipping Anjaneya, one will get Sad Buddhi सत् बुद्धि or good intellect. If the buddhi is all right, then everything else will become all right automatically. The second fruit is balam or strength. They have not put strength first in the list of fruits. If strength comes before buddhi, the one does not know in what direction one will go. Therefore, priority has been given to buddhi.

In Soundaryalahiri Adi Sankara says:
सरस्वत्या लक्ष्म्या विधिहरिसपत्नॊ विहरते 
रते: पातिव्रत्यं शिथिलयति रम्येण वपुषा ।
चिरं जीवन्नेव क्षपितपशुपाशब्यतिकर:
परानन्दाभिरब्यं रसयति रसं त्वद्भजनवान् ॥
In this sloka also, it is Saraswati who is mentioned first and then only Lakshmi. Saraswati, the Goddess of knowedge, gives us knowledge, while Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth, gives us wealth. As between wealth and knowledge, first priority has been given only to knowledge. If money comes to a person without Sad Buddhi सत् बुद्धि then he would not know how to make use of it and how to spend it properly. But if a man gets buddhi first, and then he gets money, he can make proper use of the wealth he got. Therefore, first, one should have Saraswati kataksha and then pray for Lakshmi kataksha.

The same idea is found also in the Taittriya Upanishad, which says:
स मेन्द्रॊ मेधया स्पूणॊतु ततॊ मे श्रियमावह ।
Here also, the devotee prays first for Medha or intellect and then only for wealth. Adi Sankara Bhagavatpada in his commentary says:

एभवमदीनि कुर्वाणा श्रीर्या तां ततॊ मेधानिर्वर्तनात् परम् आवह आनय ।
अमेधसॊ हि श्रीरनर्थायैवेति ।
He says that only bad things will happen to a person who gets money but who has no intellect. If a person has no knowledge or intellect, then he will use the money only for wrongful ends.

Then, the other fruits that flow from worship of Anjaneya are : fame, glory, courage, the gift of the tongue and good health.
A person may be well-versed in the Vedas and in philosophy but weak in body. A person may have mental strength but may be physically weak. A person may have a well-built body but have no mental strength. A person may be physically strong but have no bhakti. a person may have just bhakti wothout any knowledge. But Anjaneya gives such persons buddhi as well as mental strength and so many other things.
It is said that Anjaneya was an expert in nine Vyakaranas or grammar systems. Rama describes him in the Ramayana as Navavyakaranavetta (नवव्याकरणवेत्ता) So, Anjaneya is the best person to give us buddhi, (knoweldge). He gives us buddhi, (knowledge), mental strength as well as physical strength and good health.
The worship of Anjaneya is prevalent throughout India. In Andhra Pradesh, He is worshipped as Anjaneyulu; in Maharashtra, he is worshipped as Maruti. In North India, He is worshipped as Mahavira. But the name Hanuman is commonly known everywhere.
The worship of Anjaneya will do everyone immense good, Anjaneya is a symbol not only of bravery but also of a true bhakta. As the Dhyanasloka says:
यत्र यत्र रघुनाधकीर्तनं तत्र् तत्र कृतमस्तकाञ्जलिं ।
बाष्पवारिपरिपूर्णलॊचनं मारुतिं नमत राक्षसान्तकं ॥
Wherever the utterance of "Ram Ram" is heard, there Anjaneya is sitting and meditating on Sri Rama.

वैदेहीसहितं सुरद्रुमतके हैमे महामण्डपे 
मध्ये पुष्पकमासने मणिमये वीरासने सुस्थितम् ।
अग्रे वाचयति प्रभञ्जनसुते तत्त्वं मुनिभ्य: परं
व्याख्यान्तं भरतादिभि: परिवृतं रामं भजे श्यामलं ॥
Sri Rama is giving upadesa about truth to all the maharishis assembled around Him, keeping Anjaneya at the forefront. This shows the prominence given among bhaktas to Anjaneya.

The worship of Anjaneya, therefore, will give us many coveted fruits in practical life. Therefore, let us all pray to Anjaneya and obtain His grace and be happy.
|| jaya jaya shakara hara hara shankara ||
|| Sri Ram Jaya Ram Jaya Jaya Ram || 
|| Sri Ram Jaya Ram Jaya Jaya Ram ||


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